Specialty Contact Lenses

Most contact lenses come as “one size fits all,” meaning that only one or two lens shapes are used. These shapes are meant to fit most eyes. Specialty contact lenses are tailored to fit the patient’s exact eye shape and prescription. Specialty contact lenses are a great option for:

  • Patients previously told they could not wear contacts
  • Patients experiencing dry eyes with current contact lenses
  • Patients experiencing discomfort or unstable vision with current contacts
  • Patients with high astigmatism
  • Diseased eyes, such as keratoconus, post-transplants, and pellucid marginal degeneration
  • Patients requiring extremely sharp vision for sports
  • Patients interested in the latest multi-focal technology
  • Patients who don’t want to wear contacts and are not candidates for LASIK
  • Candidates for orthokeratology or corneal refractive therapy
Keratoconus

What is Keratoconus?
A corneal disorder where the central cornea undergoes progressive thinning and steepening causing irregular astigmatism.

Risk Factors
Eye rubbing
Sleep apnea
Floppy Lid Syndrome
Family History

Treatment
Specialty contact lenses provide better visual acuity and reduce changes in the cornea
Eyeglasses or soft contacts can be worn in mild cases
Moderate to severe cases may require rigid gas permeable contact lenses
Surgery may be required for patients that become contact lens intolerant or have unacceptable vision due to scarring

Crosslinking

  • Minimally invasive treatment that involves removal of the top layer of the cornea followed by soaking the cornea in riboflavin drops and a slow exposure to UV light
  • Best used on patients 30 years or younger

If you or someone you know has keratoconus, please schedule a consultation with our doctors to determine the appropriate treatment plan for your eyes.

Scleral Contact Lenses

What are Scleral Contact Lenses?
Custom contact lenses made from gas permeable lens material. These lenses give doctors the opportunity to fit even the most complex and difficult cases. If you have failed in other types of contact lenses, sclerals could be an option for you!

Scleral Lenses are used to treat:
Keratoconus
Keratoglobus
Pellucid Marginal Degeneration
Refractive surgery patients (LASIK, Radial Keratotomy (RK), and PRK)
Corneal scarring from prior infections, herpes scarring, or trauma
History of corneal transplant
High astigmatism
Severe inflammation or dryness
(Sjogren’s , Rheumatoid arthritis, chemotherapy treatment, Stevens-Johnson Syndrome)
If you or a loved one suffers from any of these conditions, scleral lenses may be the answer!  Dr. Heather West is currently pursuing her fellowship in the Scleral Lens Education Society. Fellows demonstrate extensive knowledge on fitting, managing, and caring for scleral lens patients.

GUIDES
Scleral Lens Step-by-Step Instructions (.pdf)
Commonly asked questions
Educational videos on scleral lenses